Sunday, May 21, 2006

It's all about the relationships

The work we do with organizations and communities introduces many of them for the first time to the value of social capital. It is a whole new idea that the quality of connections between people are at least as valuable to the bottom and top lines as financial and other forms of capital. The most disturbing part of this reality is that social capital can't be engineered, managed, traded, or controlled.

It can only be nurtured, as in that which is done in gardening.

3 comments:

SteveHabibRose said...

I agree, Jack. And, unfortunately, the "typical" mindset of Western business is based on a "traditional" male approach. That approach, in general, is focused on engineering, managing, trading, and controlling things, rather than growing relationships. In our sexist culture, growing relationships is a traditionally female role, and devalued.

From my perspective, we need to learn from each other -- between genders, cultures, classes etc. Each of us has the strengths that are needed by the Whole. It Takes Us All!

in community,

Habib
habib@thegarden.net
(I happen to rather like the metaphor of gardening myself :-)

Elaine Codling said...

Steve, Just a word on semantics. I notice you have used 'typical mindset' and 'traditional male approach with 'typical' and 'traditional' in quotes. Many of us struggle with terminology because we are aware that using gender based divisions confuses rather than illuminates the realities we are trying to describe. Riane Eisler solved this beautifully in her phenomenally important but largely ignored book The Chalice and the Blade. She uses the terms 'partnership'[usually associated with female] and 'dominator' ]usually associated with male] to discribe the culure and values of the respective groups. These terms more effectively identify both the problem and the strategy for generating solutions. They are inclusive in that they allow for the recognition of men like yourself and all of those contributing to this blog on network weaving [Clearly a partnership activity] and they also allow us to realise that women often buy into dominator values and activities despite their gender roles. [See www.partnershipway.org]
I hope this is helpful. Keep up the good work.

SteveHabibRose said...

Thanks for those helpful suggestions!

"in the partnership way,"

Habib